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Sep
23
Sat
Dr Zebo’s Wheezy Club @ The Laverton
Sep 23 @ 7:30 pm – 11:15 pm

Dr Zebo’s Wheezy Club brings together the lively genres of jazz & swing from the 1930s & 40s, with original and traditional fiddle tunes.  It’s all very jolly and guaranteed to keep everyone on their toes.

The band consists of Simon Taylor – guitar and vocals, Mike Fossett – fiddle and vocals and Ralf Dorrell – double bass. With a combined performance record of greater than 100 years, there is no lack of experience!

Simon and Mike go back a long way, having grown up together in the swamps of Filton, Bristol. Both play together in the well-established pub and ceilidh band The Electric Lobsters. The Lobsters have been together for nearly 30 years and are still banging it out! Mike also plays in the Prog/Rock outfit, Bluedog.

Ralf is very active on the South West music scene as a composer, performer (double bass, bass guitar and trombone), bandleader, ensemble director, lecturer, teacher and workshop tutor. He has been leading workshops on improvisation, composition and jazz since 1984. His compositions have been performed on BBC Radio 3 and at venues including the Purcell Rooms, South Bank, London and St George’s, Brandon Hill, Bristol. As a performer he has played at music festivals both in the UK ( including Glastonbury and Edinburgh ) and abroad ( Le Mans Jazz Festival ), and has performed on BBC Radios 2, 3 and 4 as well as on BBC 1 and Channel 4 television.

Zebo’s site

 

The band have just released a new album, Painting the Clouds

it will be on sale on the night.

 

Sponsored by: Haine and Smith – 19 High Street Westbury BA13 3BN

Book now

Painting the Clouds

The whole point of Dr Zebo’s music is to put a new spin on older material and to mix this with original tunes. Our set consists of quirky juxtapositions of material from a wide variety of sources within a single piece. Elements of the mix include 1920’s jazz songs sung in close harmony, original folky tunes by members of the band and quotes from well-known TV and film music: the theme music of Tom and Jerry might turn into a 16th century dance tune followed by a Tom Waits song. Even when we perform a complete piece by someone else (such as Steely Dan or Nat King Cole) it will become “Zebo-ised” by the fact that we play it on acoustic folk instruments or we will change the rhythm to something bizarre like a tango or with a reggae-feel, and often play it in a tongue-in-cheek way.

 Overall, this bizarre, funny and quirky kaleidoscope of music is very difficult to get across in a 20 sec video or audio clip. You have to experience it in the flesh!

 The gig should coincide with the launch of our first CD “Painting the Clouds”.

Dr Zebo’s

Oct
2
Mon
The Village Band @ All Saints Church
Oct 2 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Village band

Throughout the 18th and early 19th centuries,  many villages and small towns had a village band. The musicians accompanied singing in church, but also played for dances, led village processions and sometimes supported militia parades. Thomas Hardy, a keen musician, lovingly described village music in his writing.

We aim to recapture something of this, playing a variety of folk and traditional music on various instruments including concertina, fiddle, recorder, melodion and viol.

The band formed in 2016 under the auspices of Bradford on Avon branch of the U3A.

New members are most welcome contact Heather Minnion 01225 866509 or heatherminnion@hotmail.com

Oct
3
Tue
Hilperton Recorder Players @ All Saints Church
Oct 3 @ 1:00 pm – 1:45 pm

The Hilperton recorder players

The Hilperton recorder players make a welcome return to the Festival. This year they have increased their list of recorders with the acquisition of an unusual bass recorder.

 

Oct
5
Thu
Bagpipe Concert @ All Saints Church
Oct 5 @ 1:00 pm – 1:45 pm

Most of us will have seen and heard Scottish pipers but there are a wide variety of bagpipes from around the world.

This special concert will feature Northumbrian smallpipes played by Dennis Brown and Ian White and grande cornemuse (French bagpipes) with English border pipes played by Penny Birnstingl and Brian Tilley.

The Northumbrian smallpipes are a traditional instrument from Northumberland, Tyneside and North Durham, where they have been played since developing into their modern form around 200 years ago. The smallpipes are a quiet instrument, best heard indoors, and have a characteristic ‘bubbly’ sound unlike other types of bagpipe.

It is this distinctive sound that attracted both Dennis and Ian to play them; Dennis after hearing a recording of traditional piper Billy Pigg, which led to him buying his first set of pipes in 1992, and Ian while living in Northumberland, although he did not begin to play until moving to Wiltshire and meeting Dennis in the late 1990’s. Both Dennis and Ian are members of the Northumbrian Pipers’ Society, who have a local group meeting in Salisbury.

Brian Tilley has been playing traditional music on various instruments such as Concertina, Violin, Hurdy Gurdy  and Bagpipes since the age of 18.  He organises and plays in various bands for dancing and listening, and has been playing music and dancing the dances from Central France since 1995.

Penny Birnstingl studied the bassoon at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. Always looking for new challenges, she specialised in Early Music, playing crumhorns, racketts, shawms and other oddities. Somehow the bagpipes never featured on the playing list until now, but they are currently a firm favourite, as is the music of Central France.

Brian and Penny play music from the Bourbonnais region of central France on traditional french bagpipes called Grande Cornemuse or Cornemuse du Centre, and on English Border pipes.

The mouth blown french pipes have two drones, one alongside the chanter, and the other resting on the shoulder and projecting backwards to balance the weight of the pipes. They have traditional styles of decoration, hand carved and inlaid with tin or etched with fine lines and filled with dark wax. These methods were developed by mid 18th century and are still used today.  Both styles of pipes were made by Serge Durin from Riom in Central France.

The English Border pipes in G were made by Jon Swayne in Glastonbury, are mouth blown and have two drones which lie vertically on the shoulder.

The music being played is traditional French music for two bagpipes, using typical harmonies.

Oct
4
Thu
Folk Dance Evening @ Westbury Leigh Community Hall
Oct 4 @ 6:45 pm – 8:45 pm

Have you ever wondered about trying English folk dancing? The well established Westbury Folk Dance Club are opening one of their regular evenings to new members for a taster session. No experience is necessary, just come along for a for a great evening of folk dancing.

To add to the fun, some members of Bath Youth Folk will be playing a short set of traditional music before the start of the dancing at 7.30.

There will be a break for tea or coffee and biscuits at half time. Dancing is a fun way to exercise and support the Festival too. If you like it, you will be able to join and make it a regular part of your life.

Tickets available on the night.

 

Oct
5
Fri
Pipes – Penny Birnstingl & Brian Tilley @ All Saints Church
Oct 5 @ 1:00 pm – 1:45 pm

DISCOVER THE MELODIES AND RHYTHMS OF CENTRAL FRANCE

Central France is the heartland of song and dance. The Bourbonnais region of the Auvergne is home to the Bourrée, Schottish, Mazurka, Waltz and Polka, but it is the Bourrée, of which there are many versions to be found, that is perhaps the most typical dance. It is a rhythmic and  energetic dance that has delighted people for hundreds of years and is much loved by the French,  (and many English people who have now discovered it!) The accompanying music is typically played on Bagpipes and Hurdy Gurdy.

Even within the extensive Auvergne area, several types of bagpipe exist: these are very different to the more familiar Scottish pipes, and Penny & Brian use the Grande Cornemuse of the Bourbonnais area.

These instruments, made in different sizes and keys by meticulous artisans, are faithful copies of 18c instruments.

The Hurdy Gurdy is a medieval instrument which was played throughout Europe until the 17c. It is still much played in Central France and this curious instrument never fails to arouse interest.

Hurdy Gurdy, Bagpipes, Concertina and Accordion played in different combinations show the diversity of these beguiling Mazurkas, Waltzes, Schottish and Bourrées.

This is a chance to experience the vibrant rhythms and melodies of this little known area; the home of the writer George Sand.

THE TRADITIONAL DANCE MUSIC OF CENTRAL FRANCE

Central France is the heartland of song and dance.  The Bourbonnais region of the Auvergne is home to the Bourrée, Schottish, Mazurka, Waltz and Polka.  The Bourrée however, is perhaps the most typical dance.  It is a rhythmic and  energetic, much loved by the French and has delighted listeners for hundreds of years. Most typically accompaniments are played on bagpipes and hurdy gurdy..

Even within the extensive Auvergne area, several types of bagpipe exist.  These are very different to the more familiar Scottish pipes; we use the Grande Cornemuse of the Bourbonnais area. These instruments, made by meticulous artisans,  are faithful copies of 18c instruments. Often highly decorated with inlaid tin designs or more simply engraved; pipes can even have no decoration but use a black wood (formally ebony, but this is no longer permitted) with contrasting turned rings. Bagpipes come in different sizes and keys, we use pipes in C, D, G and A to produce harmonies appropriate to the music of this region.

The hurdy gurdy is a medieval instrument which was played throughout Europe until the 17c. It is still much played in Central France and this curious instrument never fails to arouse interest. The instrument used for this concert is an original French example and dates from about 1840.

The concertina was made by Louis Lachenal in 1925. It was restored in 1976 by Colin Dipper, concertina maker, who lives in Heytesbury.

The accordion is the baby of the group!  It is not from France, but from Italy and was made by Vignoni in 2013.

This is a chance to experience the vibrant rhythms and melodies of this little known area; the home of the writer George Sand, who lived and died in Nohant.  She was a great admirer of the local music and even wrote a novel entitled ‘ The Bagpipers’ (Les Maîtres Sonneurs).